Could some pain meds increase your risk for a heart attack?

St. Jude expands in pain-management technology

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The review boiled down hundreds of earlier studies that followed more than 350,000 patients. It found that people taking four 200 milligram ibuprofen pills three times a day for a year, a common dosage for arthritis patients,  increased their risk of heart attack significantly. Mayo Clinic cardiovascular specialist Stephen Kopecky, M.D. , says it’s something doctors have known about for years.  Similar concerns lead to the banning of certain brand name Cox-2 inhibitor pain medications in 2004. However, Dr. Kopecky says the lack of lawsuits against generic drug manufacturers has allowed over-the-counter pain relievers to avoid the same scrutiny.  Quick Clicks Recess, nutrition can help kids perform better “Some of the drugs that are over-the-counter now, like ibuprofen, actually have a higher risk of causing a heart attack in a patient that takes them than some of the brand name drugs that were taken off the market a few years ago.” The study estimated there would be three additional heart attacks in every 1,000 people because of use of the pain killers. The risk to heart health was also found with one of the most commonly prescribed pain killers worldwide, diclofenac.  Dr. Kopecky says many of his patients, not at risk for stomach bleeding, are on a daily low-dose aspirin regimen to reduce their risk of heart attack or stroke.  “Well, I certainly tell them, No. 1, keep taking your aspirin, don’t stop you aspirin. No. 2 is, if you can take Tylenol, or acetaminophen is the generic name, take that. We know those won’t harm your arteries or cause blood clots.” For muscle aches, Dr. Kopecky says tried and true ice or heat therapies are worth a try before turning to medication.  And he suggests those with chronic neck or back pain ask their doctors for stretching and strengthening exercises , which can be surprisingly effective when used regularly.
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Development of a tool to attempt some objectification of a difficult-to-assess symptom which is notoriously subjective, i.e. pain, and then blaming that tool on poor treatment and prescribing practices makes no sense. Asking a patient to rate their pain on a scale, incidentally routinely used for people in acute pain as well, is one piece of a multifaceted assessment of a patient’s experience of pain and not meant as some sort of a prescribing guide. And the idea is that the scale helps the patient and provider together set an expectation of pain relief based on what level of pain is not acceptable to the patient and/or is having adverse effects on their sense of health and well being. Ultimately, the scale also helps us to determine the effectiveness of treatment. So a 4 on a scale of 1-10 may mean treatment is advised for some while not for others, and certainly does not mandate opiate use. Misuse of prescription medications, in this case opiates, is indeed a serious societal problem. So I applaud Mentel’s concern, but completely disagree with his premise that the pain scale is to blame in any way. Although frequently misused, opiates are an extremely useful treatment for many types of severe pain and the majority of those who are prescribed them are able to use them appropriately and without “adding the lifelong sentence of opiates.” So let’s not throw the baby out with the bathwater and pay more attention to the responsibility of providers to appropriately prescribe and educate their patients on whatever medications they are taking.
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Pain management: Scale chiropractic north york not to blame for drug misuse

Jude Medical said in a news release. The California company’s technology complements St. Jude’s existing portfolio of products, the news release added. Spinal cord stimulators are pacemaker-style devices that send electrical pulses to spinal nerves to block pain signals. The big three manufacturers of heart pacemakers also are key players in the spinal cord stimulation market — St. Jude Medical, Fridley-based Medtronic and Natick, Mass.-based Boston Scientific. Spinal cord stimulators are part of a group of medical products known as “neuromodulation” devices. St. Jude’s division for the products is based in Texas, while Boston Scientific’s division is based in California.
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Wisconsin Pain Center Tackles Tough Pediatric Pain

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“We feel strongly that it takes that much time to really understand what’s going on with a child,” said Ms. Ladwig. The team determines how comorbid psychosocial factors can be treated with cognitive-behavioral therapies, addresses problems such as school absenteeism and opens the door for using holistic treatments. “We really work together to understand a child’s pain and formulate treatment plans that integrate all of the biopsychosocial components,” said Ms. Ladwig. “Our aim is for families to feel validated and hopeful.” Quality first In addition to being actively involved with patients and families, the Pettit Pain Center strives to constantly improve the quality of its care. Recently, its Acute Pain Service led a Six Sigma initiative that resulted in improved patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) safety. The study identified the single most common safety issue with PCA management in the pediatric population, namely, programming errors with the pump. “We dealt with a spectrum of patients, from infancy to adulthood, from kids weighing more than 300 pounds to infants weighing seven pounds,” Dr. Weisman explained. “The study developed a very successful approach to eliminate these errors.” The center collaborated with CHW’s Sickle Cell Clinic to educate patients with this disease on pain management techniques, provide cognitive-behavioral support and make members of the pain team readily available for consultations. The results: Readmissions for sickle cell patients dropped from an average of four times a year to once a year.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.painmedicinenews.com/ViewArticle.aspx?d=PRN&d_id=86&i=May+2013&i_id=951&a_id=23050

The World Market for Pain Management Drugs and Devices

Data are expressed in current U.S. dollars. The base year for data was 2012. Historical data is provided for 2010 and 2011, and forecast data are provided for each of the years 2012 through 2017. Historical, base year, and forecast data are provided for each market segment. Market shares are provided for each market segment for the 2012 base year. CHAPTER ONE: EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Introduction Scope and Methodology Size and Growth of the Market Issues and trends Leading Competitors CHAPTER TWO: INTRODUCTION AND OVERVIEW Definition of Pain Magnitude of Pain Physiology of Pain Transduction Transmission Pain Pathways Types of Pain Measurement of Pain Treatment Modalities—Pharmacologic Management Analgesic Ladder Step I Drugs Step II Drugs Step III Drugs Recommended Drug and Route Administration Routes Titration Treatment Modalities—Non-pharmacologic Management Cognitive-Behavioral Therapies Multidisciplinary Pain Management Demographics CHAPTER THREE: TREATMENT MARKETS AND FORECASTS Burn Pain Overview of Top Products Opiate Agonists—Natural Alkaloids Opiate Agonists—Semisynthetic Analogs Opiate Agonists—Synthetic Compounds Market Size and Growth Markets by Region Cancer Pain Breakthrough Cancer Pain Overview of Top Products Opiate Agonists- Natural Alkaloids Opiate Agonists-Semisynthetic Analogs Opiate Agonists- Synthetic Compounds Phenylpiperdine Compounds New and/or Innovative Products Market Size and Growth Markets by Region Dental/Facial Pain Overview of Top Products Opiate Agonists- Natural Alkaloids Opiate Agonists-Semisynthetic Analogs Opiate Agonists- Synthetic Compounds Opiate Agonist-Antagonists Centrally-acting Synthetic Analgesic Compounds New Products Market Size and Growth Markets by Region Migraine Headache Pain Overview of Top Products Selective Serotonin Agonists New and/or Innovative Products Market Size and Growth Markets by Region Musculoskeletal Pain Overview of Top Products Phenylpiperidine Compounds Cox-2 Inhibitors Non-steroid Anti-inflammatory Drugs Opioid Agonists- Natural Alkaloids Hyaluronate Sodium Derivative New and/or Innovative Products Market Size and Growth Markets by Region Neuropathic Pain Overview of Top Products Antiseizure Drugs Opiate Agonists- Natural Alkaloids Opiate Agonists-Semi-Synthetic Analogs Phenylpiperidine Compounds New and/or Innovative Products Market Size and Growth Markets by Region Obstetrical Pain Overview of Top Products Opiate Agonists—Synthetic Compounds Opiate Agonist—Antagonists Centrally Acting Synthetic Analgesic Compounds Phenylpiperidine Compounds Market Size and Growth Markets by Region Pediatric Pain Overview of Top Products Opiate Agonist-Antagonists Indole Analogs Opiate Agonists-Semisynthetic Analogs Opiate Agonists- Natural Alkaloids Market Size and Growth Markets by Region Surgical and Trauma Pain Overview of Top Products Opiate Agonists—Natural Alkaloids Opiate Agonists—Semisynthetic Analogs Opiate Agonists—Synthetic Compounds Opiate Agonist—Antagonists Centrally Acting Synthetic Analgesic Compounds New and/or Innovative Product Approvals Market Size and Growth Markets by Region CHAPTER FOUR: DRUG DELIVERY Oral Drug Delivery Parenteral Drug Delivery Transdermal Patient Controlled Analgesia Intrathecal Implants Electrotransport Drug Delivery CHAPTER FIVE: PAIN MANAGEMENT DEVICES Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulators Table of Contents v Neuromuscular Stimulators Spinal Cord Stimulators and Peripheral Nerve Stimulators PCAs and Intrathecal Pain Pumps Other Miscellaneous devices Cranial Electrotherapy Stimulation Electrothermal and Electromagnetic Therapy Thermography Market Size and Growth Markets by Region CHAPTER SIX: ALTERNATE TREATMENT MODALITIES Acupuncture ETPS Neuropathic Acupuncture Low Level Laser Light Therapy Biofeedback Relaxation Music and Pain Relief Wave Therapy Acupressure Massage Therapy Natural Supplements in Pain Management Bioelectromagnetism Radiofrequency Technology Cryoablation CHAPTER SEVEN: ISSUES AND TRENDS Overview Barriers to Cancer Pain Management Education Chronic Pain and Work Managed Care Pain Management The Fifth Vital Sign Use of Psychopharmacology in Chronic Pain Use of Botulinum Neurotoxin Research and Development Table of Contents vi Dyloject Levadex MoxDuo IR Naproxcinod Pennsaid 2% Posidur Remoxy Zelrix Zohydro ER ARC-4558 BEMA Buprenorphine NGX 1998 Sativex ATx08-001 The Elderly Oxycontin Issues Constant Pain Phenomenon Tylenol and Liver Damage Pain Medication Treatment Confusion Transporter Discovery Marijuana and Pain Control Abuse-Deterrent Painkillers Drug Abuse and Pain Control CHAPTER EIGHT: MARKET SUMMARY Total Market Size and Forecast Total Market Revenues by Region Competitor Analysis CHAPTER NINE: CORPORATE PROFILES Abbott Laboratories Actavis, Inc (formerly Watson Pharmaceuticals, Inc.) AstraZeneca plc. Baxter International, Inc. BioDelivery Sciences International (BDSI) Boehringer Ingelheim Boston Scientific Table of Contents vii Bristol-Myers Squibb Company DepoMed DURECT Corporation Eli Lilly & Co. Endo Health Solutions Inc GlaxoSmithKline plc Grunenthal Group Medtronic, Inc.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.sacbee.com/2013/06/06/5476466/the-world-market-for-pain-management.html

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