Pedang The Sumatran Tiger Undergoes Acupuncture In Israel (PHOTOS)

Can acupuncture boost fertility and cool hot flushes?

Mor Mosinzon, who treated Pedang, said the acupuncture was meant to strengthen his http://bayviewwellness.com/about/ immune system and open his ear canals so that his body can better absorb the antibiotics. Loading Slideshow Pedang, a male Sumatran tiger, who is 14-years old and suffering from chronic ear infections, is given acupuncture treatment at the Ramat Gan Safari, an open-air zoo, near Tel Aviv, on June 9, 2013. After Pedang was anesthetized the veterinarians cleaned his ears, took blood and skin samples and gave the tiger holistic treatment which is the first time this treatment has been used at the safari. (JACK GUEZ/AFP/Getty Images) Veterinarian Gila Tzur examines Pedang, a 14-year-old male Sumatran tiger that has been suffering from chronic ear problems, as it receives a holistic treatment based on acupuncture at different points in his body and ears in the Ramat Gan Safari near Tel Aviv, Israel, Sunday, June 9, 2013. (AP Photo/Ariel Schalit) Pedang, a male Sumatran tiger, who is 14-years old and suffering from chronic ear infections, is given acupuncture treatment at the Ramat Gan Safari, an open-air zoo, near Tel Aviv, on June 9, 2013. After Pedang was anesthetized the veterinarians cleaned his ears, took blood and skin samples and gave the tiger holistic treatment which is the first time this treatment has been used at the safari. (JACK GUEZ/AFP/Getty Images) Pedang, a male Sumatran tiger, who is 14-years old and suffering from chronic ear infections, is given acupuncture treatment at the Ramat Gan Safari, an open-air zoo, near Tel Aviv, on June 9, 2013. After Pedang was anesthetized the veterinarians cleaned his ears, took blood and skin samples and gave the tiger holistic treatment which is the first time this treatment has been used at the safari. (JACK GUEZ/AFP/Getty Images) Pedang, a male Sumatran tiger, who is 14-years old and suffering from chronic ear infections, is given acupuncture treatment at the Ramat Gan Safari, an open-air zoo, near Tel Aviv, on June 9, 2013. After Pedang was anesthetized the veterinarians cleaned his ears, took blood and skin samples and gave the tiger holistic treatment which is the first time this treatment has been used at the safari.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/06/09/pedang-sumatran-tiger-acupuncture-israel_n_3412005.html

“Pedang” who is a 14 year old Sumatran tiger at the Ramat Gan Safari in Israel was administered with four centimetre acupuncture needles to help stimulate his immune system. The Israeli zoo says that this was the first time that they tried Chinese medicine on an animal at the zoo. Acupuncture was started after antibiotic treatments failed. Mor Mosinzon administered the treatment and says it is hard to administer the acupuncture to wild animals. Pedang needed to be sedated in order to be treated. Unlike in the Arab Gulf, in Israel it’s not really possible for people to keep lions, tigers or cheetahs at home , or out for a ride in a white gold mercedes . Going to the zoo in Israel is a popular pastime for young and old alike, despite the fact that zoos and safaris in general are unsustainable and often cruel ways to keep animals. Sanctuaries which offer large roaming space are usually acupuncture north york best for large mammals, but we are encouraged to see alternative treatment options being used on these animals to reduce their suffering and improve their care. This particular news item, reported by Haaretz is a counter-balance to the animal abuse by Egyptian zookeepers at the Giza Zoo who in efforts to keep three bears “calm” for visitors, managed to kill them instead .
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.greenprophet.com/2013/06/pedang-israel-acupuncture/

Pedang the Tiger Gets Acupuncture to Treat Chronic Ear Infection in Israel

Lyttleton uses acupuncture in her Sydney clinic to help treat women with PCOS and other fertility problems. “It’s still early days but we have evidence that acupuncture, and in particular electro acupuncture, has good success – electro acupuncture involves passing a low frequency electric pulse through fine wires attached to acupuncture needles such that the patient feels a gentle vibration.” Underlying the symptoms of PCOS that can include excess hair and acne as well as disrupted ovulation, is a rise in levels of male hormones produced by the ovaries. The cause of this is insulin resistance which is common in women with PCOS and which often increases production of testosterone. But although acupuncture shows promise in improving ovulation there’s been little research on its effects on other symptom of PCOS – although, anecdotally,  acne often improves probably because acupuncture helps lower testosterone levels, Lyttleton says. Although some branches of complementary medicine arouse scepticism among conventional medical practitioners, attitudes towards the use of acupuncture in female infertility are more open says Dr Caroline Smith, Associate Professor in Complementary Medicine at the University of Western Sydney.  Smith is working on a study of more than a thousand women undergoing IVF – some of them with PCOS -to see if acupuncture increases their chances of a live birth. “There’s already some evidence that when acupuncture is used around the time of embryo transfer it improves the chances of pregnancy,” she says. “It may be that acupuncture increases the blood supply to the uterus which may improve the odds of the embryo implanting itself successfully. “The fact that we have 12 IVF centres involved in this study shows there’s significant interest in establishing an evidence base for acupuncture and reproductive health.” Acupuncture may also help cool hot flushes at menopause, says Melbourne GP Dr Caroline Ee who’s involved in a study of the effects of acupuncture on hot flushes by a number of research centres including the University of Melbourne, Jean Hailes for Women’s Health, RMIT University, Southern Cross University and Monash University. “Most studies so far have been small and inconclusive – but two have shown that acupuncture can make a difference,” says Dr Ee.  “I’ve seen a lot of women with hot flushes  in my practice and when I go through  the treatment options with them they’re very resistant to using drugs so I’ve tried acupuncture and it has helped some of them.” Hot flushes happen when the body’s thermostat goes  haywire, and one treatment that sometimes helps is the use of anti depressants, she explains  – one theory is that raising levels of the brain’s ‘ feel good’  hormone serotonin helps regulate body temperature.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.theage.com.au/lifestyle/diet-and-fitness/blogs/chew-on-this/can-acupuncture–boost-fertility-and-cool-hot-flushes-20130610-2nyw9.html

Acupuncture may bring hope to PCOS sufferers

Around 12 to 18 per cent of women of reproductive age are now thought to have PCOS. Its exact cause is a mystery but likely to involve genes and lifestyle. A family history of type 2 diabetes increases the risk. So how can tiny needles inserted under the skin have an impact on a woman’s ovaries? “We don’t know for sure how it works but one theory is that the needles act on the sympathetic nervous system which in turn affects the hormones that control ovulation,” says Jane Lyttleton, a traditional Chinese medicine practitioner specialising in infertility. Lyttleton uses acupuncture in her Sydney clinic to help treat women with PCOS and other fertility problems. “It’s still early days but we have evidence that acupuncture, and in particular electro acupuncture, has good success – electro acupuncture involves passing a low frequency electric pulse through fine wires attached to acupuncture needles such that the patient feels a gentle vibration.” Underlying the symptoms of PCOS that can include excess hair and acne as well as disrupted ovulation, is a rise in levels of male hormones produced by the ovaries. The cause of this is insulin resistance which is common in women with PCOS and which often increases production of testosterone. But although acupuncture shows promise in improving ovulation there’s been little research on its effects on other symptom of PCOS – although, anecdotally,  acne often improves probably because acupuncture helps lower testosterone levels, Lyttleton says.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.stuff.co.nz/life-style/wellbeing/8780850/Acupuncture-may-bring-hope-to-PCOS-sufferers

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