How acupuncture can ease childbirth pain

Acupuncture Could Improve Function In People WIth Bell’s Palsy, Study Finds

They were half as likely to request pain relief as another group of women who were not given the treatment. They were also more relaxed, which may have helped them to deal with pain, said a report in the British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology. Researcher Dr Agneta Ramnero said: ‘Acupuncture could be a good alternative or complement to those patients who seek an alternative to pharmacological analgesia in childbirth. ‘If the patient is more relaxed, she best chiropractor toronto is likely to have more control and consequently be more able to cope with the pain.’ Acupuncture, which originated in China over 2,500 years ago, is used by more than 5million people in the UK. Needles placed at specific points are said to connect with ‘energy pathways’ that run through the body. Advocates say the treatment keeps this ‘energy’ flowing around the body. The process stimulates nerves in skin and muscle, and can produce a variety of effects. It is thought to increase the release of natural painkillers in the spinal cord and the brain. This modifies the way pain signals are received.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-130023/How-acupuncture-ease-childbirth-pain.html

Canadian Olympian’s ‘nightmare’ after acupuncture needle collapses her lung

<img src='http://nationalpostnews.files.wordpress.com/2013/07/gl-070313-massagepuncture-8.jpg?w=620&h=359&#039; width='220px' alt='Glenn Lowson photo for National [link] Post’ style=’float:left;padding:5px’ />

Her various injuries both from judo and other mishaps included a dislocated elbow and shoulder, a broken hand, head injuries and repeated knee injuries that threatened to end her career shortly before the Sydney Olympics in 2000. She also suffered a dislocated jaw in the run-up to the Games, but still managed to compete. By mid-2006, Ms. Ribble-Orr was moving into the fast-developing sport of mixed-martial arts, while also eyeing a police job, and recovering from a car accident. She had already seen Mr. Spurrell five times when she visited him on June 21, complaining particularly of pounding headaches. He convinced her he could curb the head pain by inserting a two-inch needle into a muscle located between the clavicle bone and ribs, the discipline ruling said. Shortly after leaving the clinic, Ms. Ribble-Orr began having difficulty breathing, chest pain and a grinding sensation. She returned to the therapist later, wondering if she had suffered a pneumothorax. He told her it was more likely a muscle spasm, but said she could go to the hospital if she felt it was more serious or if the symptoms worsened. The next morning, she did feel worse and finally headed to the emergency department.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://news.nationalpost.com/2013/07/04/judo-acupuncture-needle/

These things come in waves, and sometimes I have theme weeks. Right now, this week appears to be developing into a week of quackademic medicine involving dubious acupuncture studies. Yesterday, it was acupuncture for lymphedema after breast cancer surgery, a study coming right about what is rapidly becoming the Barad-dur of cancer quackademia, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. How a hospital that is so awesome in every other way can have such a blind spot bigger than the Eye of Sauron, I dont know, but it does, and the result is a steady stream of embarrassing forays into quackademic medicine like yesterdays. Of course, there is one institution that far surpasses even MSKCC in the power of its quackademic woo, and that is the University of Maryland, home to Brian Berman, king of acupuncture quackademia, and my Google Alerts did there job and, well, alerted me to a new meta-analysis published online late last week in the Journal of Human Reproduction Update. Berman is the corresponding author (of course!), and a research associate by the name of Eric Manheimer is the lead author, and together with other colleagues, they have produced yet another fine analysis of tooth fairy medicine entitled, The effects of acupuncture on rates of clinical pregnancy among women undergoing in vitro fertilization: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Now, remember all the things I said about the utter lack of prior plausibility for acupuncture for treating lymphedema? You remember, how theres no plausible biological mechanism that would lead one even to suspect that sticking needles into parts of the body completely unrelated to the physiological mechanisms that result in lymphedema after mehanical interruption of regional lymphatics by surgery? All of that goes doublenay, triple!for using acupuncture for infertility and improving the pregnancy rates after in vitro fertilization (IVF). I mean, seriously. Think about it.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.democraticunderground.com/10023174143

Mixed Results for Acupuncture to Improve in Vitro Fertilization Rates

Know What To Look For It can be tough knowing where to start when beginning any new kind of treatment. First things first: know what to look for in your practitioner. Moores says “you should always check that [your acupuncturist is] licensed and in good standing.” Visit www.nccaom.org to find someone reputable. He or she should be licensed in your state and also nationally by the NCCAOM (National Certification Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine). If you are turning to acupuncture to treat a specific condition, mention it ahead of time to your practitioner. Moores says to ask if he or she has any specific experience in treating that ailment. “Usually hearing the answer will give you a good idea of whether or not you can trust him or her,” she points out. Since you will be working intimately with your accupuncturist, it is imperative to ensure you’re comfortable together. Even if the accupuncturist is well-regarded, if you don’t feel at ease, then Moores says “you are cutting yourself and your healthcare short.” Flickr photo by Kara Allyson 2. Come With An Open Mind In order to entirely reap the benefits of this treatment, try your best to come to the appointment with an open mind. Moores explains: “Acupuncture works whether you believe it in or not. However, people will say you have to believe in it to work.” Moores says that the shifts that occur from acupuncture are “subtle changes,” meaning that those who are more in touch with their bodies can more easily notice them, while those who are less in-tune toronto chiropractor may take a longer time to feel any differences.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/02/26/acupuncture-bells-palsy_n_2767694.html

Acupuncture Offers Little Boost to IVF Procedures

The analysis conducted by the University of Maryland Center for Integrative Medicine and published online in the journal Human Reproduction Update found the technique may be beneficial for patients treated at fertility clinics that have low pregnancy rates. But patients who undergo IVF at clinics with better-than-average success rates appear to gain no benefit from the ancient Asian health practice. “Our systematic review of current acupuncture/IVF research found that for IVF clinics with baseline pregnancy rates higher than average [32 percent or greater] adding acupuncture had no benefit,” said lead researcher Eric Manheimer. “However, at IVF clinics with baseline pregnancy rates lower than average [less than 32 percent] adding acupuncture seemed to increase IVF pregnancy success rates. We saw a direct association between the baseline pregnancy success rate and the effects of adding acupuncture: the lower the baseline pregnancy rate at the clinic, the more adjuvant acupuncture seemed to increase the pregnancy rate.” IVF involves fertilizing a woman’s egg with sperm outside the womb and then implanting the embryo in the woman’s uterus. According to the researchers, acupuncture is the most commonly used complementary alternative therapy among couples seeking treatment at fertility clinics in the United States. The findings of the new analysis are based on an examination of 16 studies involving more than 4,000 patients. According to the researchers, international differences may be one factor in varying pregnancy rates in the studies they analyzed. For example, European clinics may have lower IVF pregnancy rates than U.S. clinics because European countries are increasingly moving toward single embryo transfers. “Another potential explanation for the different effects of acupuncture in trials with higher versus lower baseline rates may be that in IVF settings where the baseline pregnancy rates are already high, the relative added value of additional co-interventions, such as acupuncture, may be lower,” added Manheimer. The researchers said more study is needed to examine if acupuncture might be a useful add-on procedure in IVF clinics with lower baseline rates, including considerations of safety and cost-effectiveness. 2013 NewsmaxHealth.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.newsmaxhealth.com/Health-Wire/acupuncture-ivf-in-vitro/2013/07/08/id/513866

More Tooth Fairy Science: Acupuncture does not improve in vitro fertilization success rates

We saw a direct association between the baseline pregnancy success rate and the effects of adding acupuncture: the lower the baseline pregnancy rate at the clinic, the more adjuvant acupuncture seemed to increase the pregnancy rate.” IVF is a process that involves fertilizing a woman’s egg with sperm outside the womb and then implanting the embryo in the woman’s uterus. According to the researchers, acupuncture is the most commonly used adjuvant, complementary therapy among couples seeking treatment at fertility clinics in the United States. This new analysis examined 16 studies with more than 4,000 patients and builds on the Center for Integrative Medicine’s 2008 review of acupuncture and IVF, published in the British Medical Journal. That study found positive results for using acupuncture for women undergoing IVF when acupuncture was performed during embryo transfer. “The University of Maryland School of Medicine is an international leader in investigating the risks and benefits of complementary and alternative therapies. This new analysis is another example of our faculty’s commitment to using comprehensive scientific study to further understanding and inform clinicians and patients who are considering these integrative therapies,” says E. Albert Reece, M.D., Ph.D., M.B.A., vice president for medical affairs at the University of Maryland and the John Z. and Akiko K. Bowers Distinguished Professor and dean of the University of Maryland School of Medicine. According to the authors, international differences may be one factor in varying baseline pregnancy rates in the studies they analyzed.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/07/130701163739.htm

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