The Magic Of Massage Therapy

Oil therapy: the best oil for your body

In massage therapy, a trained therapist applies pressure to the muscles and other soft tissues to help heal underlying conditions. There are more than 80 different forms of massage therapy, including shiatsu, Swedish, pressure point, and deep-tissue massage. Massage usually is intended to decrease pain, relax muscles, and let blood and oxygen flow freely to that area of the body. Healing techniques involving massage are thousands of years old and have been mentioned in ancient texts from Egypt, Rome, China, Greece, India, and Japan. Massage Therapy: When Is It Used? Massage therapy can be used to address a number of different health problems, including sports injuries and chronic pain. Musculoskeletal problems, pre- or post-surgical treatment, lymphedema [excessive fluid buildup that often occurs in the arms or legs] those all are probably most effectively treated by massage, says Ron Schneeweiss, professor of family medicine at the University of Washington in Seattle. According to Schneeweiss, massage therapy is the type of alternative medicine most often acceptable to conventional doctors. Massage Therapy: Is It Effective? Massage therapy has been shown to be effective in varying degrees.
For the original back pain clinic version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.everydayhealth.com/alternative-health/healing-therapies/massage-therapy.aspx

Massage Therapy Gains Sign of Acceptance

(Bergen County Prosecutor’s Office/Cliffview Pilot) Follow on Twitter on November 06, 2013 at 5:29 PM, updated November 06, 2013 at 5:59 PM ENGLEWOOD An independent massage therapist is facing charges of sexual assault after he allegedly became too touchy at an Englewood day spa, according to prosecutors. Felipe D. Cruz, 52, was arrested Tuesday in Englewood on one count of sexual assault, a second degree charge, and one count of criminal sexual contact, a fourth degree charge. A female customer of the D2 Day Spa in Englewood claims that during a massage session, Cruz, of Englewood, “inappropriately fondled” her. “The victim stopped the session, confronted Cruz and then contacted the Englewood Police Department, who notified the Special Victims Unit,” Bergen County Prosecutor John L. Molinelli said. “An investigation ensued resulting in the arrest of Cruz. Cruz has done independent work for D2 Day Spa for about one year.” The massage therapist remains at Bergen County Jail in lieu of $75,000 bail. He’s scheduled to be arraigned on Nov. 20.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.nj.com/bergen/index.ssf/2013/11/englewood_massage_therapist_arrested_for_touching_all_the_wrong_places_prosecutor_says.html

Englewood massage therapist arrested for touching all the wrong places, prosecutor says

The program, which has 350 students, started in 1981. The center also has programs in acupuncture; herbal medicine; Oriental medicine; amma therapy, or specialized massage therapy, and holistic nursing. Mr. Schenkman said the center was planning for bachelor’s, master’s and clinical doctorate degrees. At the start of the semester, massage therapy had its largest enrollment, 105 new students. The four-semester program requires 63 credits, leading to an associate degree in occupational studies, with a major in massage http://BayviewWellness.com therapy. The academic dean of the program, Dr. Robert Borzone, said the curriculum combined courses in Western medicine and Oriental medicine and included clinical internships. The public is becoming more open minded to complementary medicine, Mr. Schenkman said, adding: ”One of the biggest changes is the realization that this is not a threat to Western medicine, as researchers have found that most patients who seek holistic health care do not abandon their mainstream providers.” Changing attitudes are created new demands on insurance companies. Last month Oxford Health Plans Inc. announced plans to create an alternative-medicine network in New York, New Jersey and Connecticut, starting in January.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.nytimes.com/1996/11/10/nyregion/massage-therapy-gains-sign-of-acceptance.html

However, it may be interesting to note that city neurologists do not endorse a similar opinion on the benefits of a massage. Though Dr Mayank Pandya says that a massage raises the level of endomorphin, it can’t be attributed to healing. “Each case is different, and most of the times, the local relief is due to what we call ‘counter irritation’. For instance when you apply a balm, the relief is due to the burning sensation that takes over and last only that long.” More on oil therapy To be able to enjoy a massage and reap maximum benefits, the choice of the oil is very important. While at a spa, you are more likely to be treated to a blend of aromatic oils, if you are planning to get yourself the soothing treatment at home, here’s are the options you can pick from: Sweet almond oil It’s one of the most popular massage oils even among massage therapists. Pale yellow in color, it’s absorbed fairly quickly, thus not making you feel greasy. Apricot kernel oil Rich in Vitamin E, it is a good alternative to sweet almond oil for people with nut allergies. However, it’s slightly costlier than almond oil. Jojoba oil Jojoba is actually a wax extracted from the seed of the jojoba plant. It’s a good option for most people prone to back acne because it is thought to have antibacterial properties and contains long chain wax esters that closely resembles skin sebum.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/life-style/beauty/Oil-therapy-the-best-oil-for-your-body/articleshow/18219747.cms

Massage Therapy for Osteoarthritis

Find out why many Americans use massage as part of their osteoarthritis treatment. Medically reviewed by Lindsey Marcellin, MD, MPH When used properly, one of the oldest treatments known to man massage therapy can help relieve one of our oldest and most common ailments osteoarthritis . The value of massage therapy was discovered long ago, practiced in ancient Greece, China, and India. According to a National Health Interview Survey, today about 18 million Americans receive massage therapy every year. Osteoarthritis, which affects about 12 percent of Americans between their early teen years and their mid-70s, occurs when wear and tear breaks down the cartilage cushions between the joints, causing pain and stiffness. Massage therapy seems to ease the pain. “When done by a trained massage therapist on carefully selected patients, massage therapy is a very valuable addition to traditional osteoarthritis treatments ,” says Valerie Voner, LMT, a licensed massage therapist and coordinator of the massage therapy program at Cape Cod Community College in West Barnstable, Mass. The Benefits of Massage Therapy Chronic osteoarthritis responds well to massage, Voner says. Pain is relieved, as the muscles surrounding the joints relax, releasing stiffness and allowing for better range of motion and mobility. Voner, who has been practicing massage therapy since 1975, points out the many benefits that can be achieved by using massage therapy as an osteoarthritis treatment: Decreased pain and increased mobility Increased blood flow to areas of arthritis, bringing oxygen to help healing Flushing out of toxic inflammatory substances that add to pain and swelling Increased relaxation, decreased stress, and a sense of well-being The Science Behind Massage Therapy “It’s hard to find good research on message therapy for osteoarthritis because there have been few controlled studies,” says Voner. “It’s hard to measure relaxation and well-being objectively.” For the most part, she says, the research has been anecdotal.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.everydayhealth.com/osteoarthritis/massage-therapy-for-osteoarthritis.aspx

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