Real, Fake Acupuncture Treatments Quell Cancer Drug Side Effects

acupuncture, eastern medicine

However, fake acupuncture treatment also helped alleviate side effects of drugs commonly used to treat breast cancer, according to researchers. (Photo : Yuriko Nakao/Reuters) Acupuncture can help relieve side effects of breast cancer drugs, a new study suggests. However, fake acupuncture treatment also helps alleviate side effects of breast cancer drugs. Researchers said that the latest findings raise the question of whether acupuncture really has beneficial effects. Patients who take a drug called an aromatase inhibitor (which inhibits the enzyme that produces estrogen in postmenopausal women) often feel joint/muscle pain and stiffness, and menopausal symptoms like hot flashes. Half of participants were given eight weekly acupuncture treatments, and the other half received a kind of fake (or “sham”) acupuncture that involved non-penetrating retractable needles placed in sham acupoints (non-acupuncture points). Both groups experienced improvement of their symptoms, especially hot flashes. However, researchers noted that there was little difference in benefits between the real acupuncture and the sham acupuncture. “It could be that there is no difference, or it could be that in this small trial we just didn’t have enough patients to detect a significant difference,” Bao said in a news release. Researchers noted that none of the patients reported significant side effects. “This is important because other treatments for symptoms often do have side effects, so showing that this treatment works without side effects could be a big improvement in the treatment of cancer survivors,” explained Bao. While the study did not focus on racial differences, researchers found that African American women experienced a greater reduction in the severity and frequency of hot flashes if they had real acupuncture rather than sham acupuncture when compared to women of other ethnic groups.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.counselheal.com/articles/8056/20131223/real-fake-acupuncture-treatments-quell-cancer-drug-side-effects.htm

Both real and ‘sham’ acupuncture help ease side effects of widely used breast cancer drug

E. Albert Reece, M.D., Ph.D., M.B.A., vice president for medical affairs at the University of Maryland and the John Z. and Akiko K. Bowers Distinguished Professor and Dean of the University of Maryland School of Medicine, says, “Aromatase inhibitors are a very important advance in treating postmenopausal women with estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer, but side effects may cause some patients to stop treatment. This study led by Dr. Bao, an oncologist and medical acupuncturist, offers some intriguing evidence that acupuncture even sham acupuncture may be helpful in alleviating some side effects. These findings warrant further investigation.” In February 2013, Dr. Bao and her colleagues reported similar findings in the journal Breast Cancer Research and Treatment in regard to joint and muscle pain associated with treatment with aromatase inhibitors. They found that acupuncture and sham acupuncture improved breast cancer patients’ symptoms but saw no statistical difference between the two interventions. ### About the University of Maryland School of Medicine Established in 1807, the University of Maryland School of Medicine is the first public medical school in the United States, and the first to institute a residency-training program. The School of Medicine was the founding school of the University of Maryland and today is an integral part of the 11-campus University System of Maryland. On the University of Maryland’s Baltimore campus, the School of Medicine serves as the anchor for a large academic health center which aims to provide the best medical education, conduct the most innovative biomedical research and provide the best patient care wellness centre and community service to Maryland and beyond.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2013-12/uomm-bra121913.php

Sham acupuncture as good as real one to ease side effects of anticancer drugs

The research may help clinicians improve care for cancer patients. The results also raise the question of whether sham acupuncture is truly inert or may, like real acupuncture, have beneficial effects. Breast cancer patients who take a type of drug called an aromatase inhibitor (which inhibits the enzyme that produces estrogen in postmenopausal women) often experience side effects, including joint and muscle pain and stiffness, and menopausal symptoms such as hot flashes. To see .. [read more] if acupuncture could help alleviate patients’ symptoms, Ting Bao MD, DAMBA, MS, of the University of Maryland Greenebaum Cancer Centre in Baltimore, and her colleagues recruited 47 breast cancer survivors taking aromatase inhibitors and suffering from joint/muscle discomfort to participate in a clinical trial. About half of the patients received eight weekly acupuncture treatments, and the other half received a kind of fake (or “sham”) acupuncture that involved non-penetrating retractable needles placed in sham acupoints (non-acupuncture points). Both groups experienced lessening of their symptoms, especially hot flashes, but there was little difference in benefits between the real acupuncture and the sham acupuncture. “It could be that there is no difference, or it could be that in this small trial we just didn’t have enough patients to detect a significant difference,” said Dr. Bao. “This is important because other treatments for symptoms often do have side effects, so showing that this treatment works without side effects could be a big improvement in the treatment of cancer survivors.” The study was published in journal CANCER.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://zeenews.india.com/news/health/healthy-eating/sham-acupuncture-as-good-as-real-one-to-ease-side-effects-of-anticancer-drugs_25744.html

Joanie Stewart of Back to Health Center Named Acupuncture Society of Virginia Treasurer

In addition to her training in acupuncture , Dr. Joanie has served as a medical writer for CBS/Medscape (now WebMD), as an editorial director at the former Lifetime Medical Television, and as a yoga therapist and instructor. She is also trained in Cranio-Sacral Therapy, Body Talk Access, and acupuncture for facial rejuvenation. “Dr. Joanie draws on a wide breadth of experience in both Western and Eastern medical traditions to provide high quality, life-changing care for our patients,” said Alexandria chiropractor Dr. Shara Posner. “We are excited that she is part of our Alexandria wellness team. As our practice grows to include more expectant mothers, Dr. Joanie is also offering acupuncture to assist with induction for late-term mothers.” Dr. Joanie encourages individuals who are struggling with acute or chronic pain or other health conditions, and are looking for an alternative to medication or other interventions, to consider acupuncture. “Acupuncture is a great complement to chiropractic care and massage therapy for enhanced pain management, as it restores balance to the whole body,” said Dr.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://finance.yahoo.com/news/joanie-stewart-back-health-center-150000105.html

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